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thurners candles and stood with others praying for the civil rights leader. there were scenes like this across sfrikdz today. more now from al jazeera nick schifrin. >> nelson mandela talked about a rainbo nation. his struggle wasn't on behalf of black south africans but on behalf of all segregated and humiliated by racist rulers. >> nelson mandela wanted to build a nation united in diversity. citizens of all races and religion say mandela created that had unity. at an interfaith service, south africans celebrated the respect that mandela provided them. >> celebrate. it's an important model for human society. >> it lions us to be. >> down the road at an indian rally, man dela was thanked on behalf of children. 20 years ago, perussia was a second-class citizen. apartheid didn't only segregate blacks. >> we were part of the deprived lot. >> her husband suffered the same. he remembers being humiliated just for eating dinner. >> we used to go down in the evening to find something to eat. we had to say to the guy. sorry, do you sell to us? he would say, no we don't but you guys can go a
washington. >>> president obama is making a long trip from washington to south africa to honor civil rights legend nelson mandela. tomorrows memorial service will serve as a rare reunion of nearly all of the living american presidents. kpix5 is in the news room now and the number of dig any tar its i imagine is giving south african police quite a security challenge. >> reporter: yes, frank. more than 80,000 mourners are expected to attend the memorial and thousands of police officers will be on hand and right now a memorial outside nelson mandela's former home is growing as well as a crowd of south africans who have come together since his death. >> police are preparing today for a memorial service for nelson mandela at a soccer stadium tomorrow. president obama leaves this morning for south africa where he will attend the massive public memorial. former presidents bush, clinton and carter will also be in attendance along with more than 50 heads of state, making it one of the largest gatherings the world leaders in recent history. >> this is a test for us. >> the head of south africa's nati
luther king jr. and the country's civil rights and you were on south africa on the day mandela walked out of prison. tell us about that moment. >> you know, it was a moment difficult to describe. he took us on unbelievable heights of joy that day. and the depths of pain. a huge larger than life figure. i've gotten into south africa quite by chance in 1979 and connected with his family and we instructed in the 1990. and we had the feeling he would be released this weekend so my son and i met him there. what surprised me was he recognized me and call my name. he had seen the convention speech from the democratic convention. he came out and stopped. i'm sure the governor will say that he was unbelievably slumped. he came out not just reading speeches but up for debate. >> what do you think his enduring legacy will be around the world? is it the concept that i've heard you speak? the concept of forgiveness and reconciliation? >> i think it is the thing everybody says. that he was the true towering moral figure of our time. why do people say that he is the leader that they most respect? everyb
the apartheid fight, the fight to end apartheid was their civil rights struggle that they were able to emotionally connect to. >> remembering mandela, you'll be talking about that on "meet the press" coming up at 10:30 here on nbc 4. thank you so much, david. >> all right, guys. good to see you. >> we continue to stay on top of our wintry weather that has made its with an he he to our area. >> let's check in with chuck. >> vj and i are in the storm center, keeping track of every flake as it comes down across the area. a lot more flakes coming up this morning into today. we're all worried about the we're all worried about the chanceuse chase freedom atselecs and get 5% cash back this quarter. so you can give her an even bigger surprise. activate your 5% cash back at chase.com/freedom chase. so you can. live pictures now outside the u.s. capital. you can really make out those big fat snowflakes coming down there. pretty impressive. >> we want to take you over to the white house. seeing a lot of white around here as well, steady flow of snowflakes making their way down. pretty picture.
a message to state legislatures. >> i think it's a big help. the civil rights act didn't end racism. i don't think this is going to end homophobia or transphobia. >> reporter: zachary kiesch, news 4. >>> right now at 6:00, d.c. mayor vincent gray talks up his administration after announcing he will seek re-election but gets testy with reporters who challenge him on skal dal allegations. >> i'm done. i'm done, okay, i'm done. >>> plus, a d.c. cop facing charges of child pornography for pictures he took on the job. why there could be more victims. >>> president obama taking on critics of the affordable care act. >> the bottom line is, this law is working and will work into the future. >>> good evening, everybody. i'm jim handly in for jim vance. >> i'm doreen gentzler. we begin with the fast moving race for d.c. mayor a day after vincent gray filed for re-election. reporters peppered him with questions about a federal probe of his 2010 campaign for mayor. tom sherwood reports all gray wanted to talk about was what's ahead. tom? >> the mayor is proud of the city's economic development, but he
the respect he had for judge pryor, i knew mr. pickering who had really been a pioneer for civil rights in the state of mississippi in the 1960's and 1970's when it was hard to be. the truth was the majority of democrats said, we're going t to -- we're going to block 10 of the bush judges. never been done before, but we're going to do it with a cloture vote. well, madam president, as you can guess, everyone on the republican side in the majority then got very excited. and the majority leader, senator frist, said, we're going to change the rules, do something that senator lott, a majority leader once said, was the nuclear option. and there was great consternation. senator reid said -- he recounts this very well in his book -- in 2006, he said, to do so would be the end of the senate. i made two speeches, madam president. i suggested, well, this is a terrible thing to do. a president ought to have an up-or-down vote on his circuit judges. so why don't we see if we can't get a few republicans and a few democrats and just take it out of the hands of the leaders and agree that we'll only use
international media showing you how nelson mandela touched lives for civil rights around the world. fellow south africans, you know, nelson mandela brought them together as well. he had been in and out of the hospital for months. in june, he was admitted to a facility for a lung infection. we'll be here all evening long. people are coming here. in fact, a man, moments ago, dropped off flowers here. he just stood. he didn't say anything. he stood, looked at the statue and calmly walked away. live here on massachusetts avenue, outside the south african embassy, i'm shomari stone, news 4. >> thank you. >> we heard the little girl mention his family. he is survived by a wife, three of his children and a couple dozen grandchildren and great grandchildren. >> they were by his bedside late this afternoon. >> we have been seeing the live pictures of nelson mandela's statue this evening. tom sherwood was there when the statue was unveiled this past september. it's a shame to see the fence and the barbed wire. >> i hope it will move some of the reconstruction, the embassy is being rebuilt. if they could m
inspiration from him during the civil rights days here in america, and they prayed for him and gave him their support all those years when he was in prison. and, of course, it was a big event here when only a few months after he got out of prison, he came to visit this church. it does beg the question how you memorialize this man in just one sermon. we spoke earlier to senior pastor j. edgar boyd? >> i he dismantled with the prison cell with the help of those here in america and other parts of the world, the giant, the you know grateful and the wronged giant of apartheid. he disassembled it and brought about hope, and it brought about liberation not only for himself but for peace-loving people throughout south africa. >> new mexico new mexico had been out of the public eye for many years before he died but there are parishioners here who met him and we spoke to one of them? >> what a blissing it meet in gentleman, more than anything in life, the one who told us to forgive. the hardest thing to do in life is to forgive. he told us to forgive. no forgive and move on. yes, et cetera my her
, they weren't violating people's civil rights or privacy and it was a program carefully monitored and it is unfortunate the only person we have now to defend it is the president but nobody trusts him. he didn't know about the irs. >> do you believe that? >> i find it hard to believe. >> which is worse that he didn't know or he did know and he lied? >> i think the latter. i think -- i don't know how many times s you can say i didn't know about that. the president of the united states, on issues that big, on benghazi for example and the irs scandal, i think those are things that if he doesn't know about he has an incompetent staff or given instructions he doesn't want to know. but the idea he didn't know about what was going on strikes me as just not credible. >> all right. i'll have more of our special chat with former vice president dick cheney tonight at 8:00 p.m. you might be surprise who is impressing him in the early presidential sweepstakes. it is not necessarily a certain governor in the state of new jersey. who is and who isn't, his struggle right now, his daughters are fig
. stateside, a yuounger generatio of american civil rights leaders is reflecting on the legacy of the man and how he inspired them. one of them downing me now from washington, d.c. former president and ceo of the naacp, ben jellis. i'd like to know when nelson mandela first got on your radar. what was the first context in which you learned about him and when you first saw him in person. >> you know, the first conversation was with my mom explaining to me why we couldn't drink coke and we couldn't get gas from the shell station and really talking about how similar the struggle that was happening then in south africa was to what she had gone through as a young person in this country. the first time i saw him was he was doing a tour when he got out of prison. it was 1989. he came to the coliseum in the east bay. i and tens of thousands of people were all gathered there. i recall pushing my way up to the front. you know, for us, we were used to having black leaders assassinated in their prime and spending the rest of our lives wondering what could have been, what would have been. and with him
. for our president to be so moved by mandela, to really have his own place in a civil rights struggle against apartheid. >> when it comes to president obama's presence on the international stage this potential for comprehensive agreement with iran yesterday. it could be worse. when it comes to the international stage how is his capital? >> i don't think it is exceedingly high. i think a lot of american allies think america has lost its nerve in some regard particularly when it comes to confronting iran. i think there is difficulty with our credibility because our economic standing has impact as well. it doesn't diminish america's power and influence in the world. >> how much focus for president obama in terms of international? it isn't just iran? >> it is looking so difficult. as you look towards next year disengaging from afghanistan becomes the story. iran becomes the big test. no one knows whether iran will do what president obama wants it to do which is basically dismantle any pretense. >> nice to have you here. we'll see you a little bit laterer. a little bit later. >>> we vel a
in the civil rights struggle against apartheid i think makes it very meaningful. his presence will be significant. >> when it comes to president obama's presence on the international stage, we know he's talking about this potential for comprehensive agreement with iran yesterday. he said it's 50/50 or, frankly, it could be worse. his approval numbers very low here. when it comes to the international stage, how is his capital right now? >> i don't think it's exceedingly high. i think a lot of america's allies, particularly in the middle east from israel to some of the gulf countries think america has lost its nerve in some regard, particularly when it comes to confronting iran. so i think there is some difficulty with ourbili because our economic standing has some impact as well. it doesn't diminish america's overall power in the world and america's real influence in the world. that is still very, very strong, even if some people have doubts about president obama. >> how much of a focus is there for president obama in terms of international, seg tear hagel making his way to afg
family has filed a federal civil rights lawsuit. this as the police department continues to investigate exactly what happened. its findings will be turned over to the district attorney and the district attorney will decide whether a crime was committed. alex savidge, ktvu channel 2 news. >>> later today, the senate is expected to vote on whether to renew a ban on plastic guns that can evade metal detectors. the 25-year-old ban is due to expire at midnight. today's vote is on extending the ban for ten more years. last week, the house voted to approve the extension. >>> the main library is increasing security after a string of problems after a recent attack. in september, a 61-year-old man was hit in the head by a chair while using a library computer. there have been complaints about bathroom conditions, people using drugs and found sleeping in the library. in response, the library plans to higher more security guards and cuss toldian and increase -- custodians and increase the hours of the part-time employee. >>> state and local lawmakers are scheduled to attend a conference today on the
to compound. so the two things i end up by saying, i'm reminded of something the civil rights leader when he said we may have arrived on these shores in different ships, but we're all in the same boat now. what's going on in this town is that too often, the two political parties, you think they're from different countries. they view the other side as the enemy, not the fell blow citizens with whom they occasionally disagree. but in the long run, they have the sate fate, interests in common. we have to reconcile our differences, not accentuate them. but we forget we come from a common country and common heritage and for sure a common destiny. final thing i say, this is something that no labels is working to overcome. in this city today, what all of you have to do every section is forge principle compromise, the word compromise, back in the dale, my father's time, that was an act of statesmanship. today it's a act of betrayal. if you don't work with your party 100% of the time, you're ostracized, there's something wrong with you. you can see this on cable tv and a variety of other things. i'll
with luis. she also became very interested in civil rights. we have a problem at that time was a white supremacist group in town, and she held a group of people lobby to get a unanimous vote in the legislature for a law allowing civil damages for civil harassment. that brought an end to that white supremacist compound that gave coeur d'alene a pretty bad name sometimes. she didn't want anyone to be known for that. at one point people and urged her to for governor, and share the name recognition. she had the people behind or. she had a lot of the things that any of the politicians would want, and she knew it. but she didn't. she chose not to. for several reasons, and i talk about them in the book but i think the biggest, she was not one to say her own name over and over. she preferred to work behind the scenes. and became one of those people that worked in the senator's office, and the congressman's office, the governor's office, to get things done outside the political fight. i came here 20 years ago to be the pastor of her church. i count in the book some interesting little stories. o
holmes norton has her own memories of south africa's history. she was among four civil law right leaders who helped sparks months of demonstrations that helped bring about reform in south africa and freedom for trade unions there. she said it was time to celebrate his long and worthy life of making life better for many people. >> there's not a lot to mourn if you consider the life he lived and his gift to the world. we always mourn for the passing of one of the great men of our time. but in south africa, they're dancing. they are jubilant because their freedom is a straight line from his sacrifice. >>> the national museum of african art is another place to sign a condolence book for mandela. it will be available until next friday during regular visiting hours. you can also post messages on the website or facebook page. >>> metro is doing track work on all five rail lines this morning i. could put a wrench in your plans. in northern virginia, the arlington cemetery station is closed this weekend. you can take a free shuttle bus and you can only get to arlington cemetery on a bus leaving t
or government defendants. thus attorneys' fees provisions are mostly found in civil right, environmental protection and other statutes. the provision in this bill differs from other congressional exceptions in that it would require anyone who loses a patent claim to pay the attorneys' fees of even large corporate defendants. this is a giant deterrent to genuine inventors from filing good-faith suits to defend their valid patents claims. therefore i urge the adoption of the watt-conyers substitute which would drop the losers pays provisions from the underlying bill while still including the key reforms that are present in the underlying bill and in the senate bill drafted by senate -- senator leahy. i urge adoption of the substitute and i yield back the balance of my time. the chair: the gentleman from new york yields back. the gentleman from virginia is recognized. mr. goodlatte: mr. chairman, at this time i'm pleased to yield two minutes to the gentlewoman from california who has been a great person to work with on the judiciary committee and here on the floor of the house on this legis
't been discouraged by how hard it has been because stuff that is worth it is always hard. civil rights movement was hard. giving women the right to vote, that was hard. >> subcommittee will come to order. we will begin a round of questioning. i will start that off. my first question will be for mr. abrams. you note in your written testimony that one manner in which claims become complex because the va error. cases that disorder often appealed angry man had. often more than once further increasing the complexity of the claim procedurally. number one, can you elaborate on the common errors which causes claims to be more complex due to va error on appeal? and number two, to think greater focus on appeal and remanded claims would assist va learning from it mistakes and making less of these types of errors in the future? >> yes, i can. let me give you an example. suppose a veteran files a claim for pts d. the veteran alleges that he suffered a stress the next goes to combat. the veteran service records show a combat
for mobile justice and civil rights work. there is so much more here. he was an adviser to secretary of state condoleezza rice. when i first met him, the council of the department of state he's a member of the president's intelligence advisory board and he was for president bush and president obama and he has written a number of books. germany unified. statecraft is a good one. he wrote that with condoleezza rice and most importantly he is a member of the aspen strategy group that he directed from 2,000 to 2003. i will sort by asking michele and fill up a few questions and then i will open up to the audience. we are in a transitional period for american defense strategy. are there lessons? thathat is a build down from lat summer of the pentagon. are there lessons in earlier periods in history that can help guide us now? >> what don't you answer that question. >> good afternoon everyone. it's wonderful to see so many familiar faces around the table. i do think there are some lessons to be learned from our history in terms of periods like this where we are coming out of a period of war and we a
. >> reporter: i want to get your thoughts as someone who has walked among civil rights giants and nelson mandela, and martin luther king. how aware were the two of them aware to their roles in the struggles? >> dr. king went to jail in '63 and so did nelson mandela. dr. king in his address referenced the struggle in south africa. the kinship from the american corporations and south africa and our government that was a part of it. also the things that we did here enabled mandela's freedom. for example, the '65 riots act that changed the course in this country. blacks could vote for the first time in the south and women could vote and you could vote on campuses and bilanguagebilangua. it clouded the sanctions on south africa led by congressman randell o. it seems to me our struggle and their struggle coincided very well. >> reporter: we appreciate your thoughts on this day, remembering nelson mandela. thank you. >> i'll see you before the week is over. >> reporter: all right. look forward to it. let's head back to new york now and erica. >> lester, thanks. >>> we want to turn to encour e
's about civil rights. >> dave? >> this is the mood certainly in maryland and parts of the you state to be more welcoming, more open, gay marriage, the revolution and thinking on gay people and people who have other issues in that regard -- not issues, but transgenders, people like that. just another move in the direction. hyattsville today could be a lot of other cities tomorrow. >> i tend to agree. i don't think there's -- it's notable that this step has been taken. but unless it leads to a larger, more broader sort of conversation about discrimination generally, it may just be something localized. this is the kind of thing i expect out of tacoma park. surprised that hyatts vilville took -- >> i like people that call it park. >> discrimination is discrimination. >> dave mcconnell, jerry. thank you for being with us. i'm pat lawson muse. that's it for reporter's notebook. news 4 today continues. >>> we're keeping close watch on a winter storm. a live look over the potomac river right now at 6:30, courtesy of our camera at national harbor. even though it's along the water, it's one o
the modern mother of the civil rights movement, rosa parks. this past sunday, we celebrated the 58th anniversary of rosa parks refusing to give up her seat on that bus in montgomery, alabama. i am so proud to stand here from the great state of ohio because it was the great state of ohio that was the first state in this nation to name december 1 rosa parks day. on thursday and friday of this week in our district, we will bring people from all over the state to pay tribute to her. and we will bring in more than 600 little children who will learn about civil rights and understand the value of working together. the last day, 1955, she started something larger than herself. she stood -- she sat down so we could stand up. mr. speaker, it is my honor to be a part of the legislation that created december 1 in ohio as rosa parks day. thank you and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back. for what purpose does the gentleman from pennsylvania seek recognition? >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks. the speake
a positive environment for civil society and to protect the rights of all ukrainians to express their views on the country's future in a constructive and peaceful manner. violence and intimidation should have no place in today's ukraine. to support the aspirations of the ukrainian people to achieve a prosperous european democracy. european integration is the surest course of economic growth and strengthening ukraine's democracy. thanks very much. >> here at the end of this briefing you can see it in its entirety on c-span that -- you can wor. live coverage here on c-span again now coming back at 5:00 p.m. eastern. we posted a question on our facebook page asking about your thoughts on congressional prod uctivity. a couple of responses. michael says, when you elect people who are contentious of government, you'll get that government. tracy offers the, hail hail term limits, hourly pay. congress has to me perks, and privileges. you can post your thoughts at facebook.com/bcspan, . coming up on c-span2, french opposition leader john prince walkup a -- will talk about his recent nuclear deal wit
holiday gift for the birther in your family. i can think of some. >>> up next, the political civil war. hoping new fights on the right may cost the republicans a couple of winnable senate seats. remember how that happened last night? you're watching "hardball," the place for politics. [ male announcer ] you've got to try red lobster's four course seafood feast, just 15.99. start with soup, salad and cheddar bay biscuits then choose one of eight entrees plus dessert! four perfect courses, just 15.99. come in to red lobster today and sea food differently. where their electricity comes from. they flip the switch-- and the light comes on. it's our job to make sure that it does. using natural gas this power plant can produce enough energy for about 600,000 homes. generating electricity that's cleaner and reliable, with fewer emissions-- it matters. ♪ so i can reach ally bank 24/7, but there ar24/7.branches? i'm sorry, i'm just really reluctant to try new things. really? what's wrong with trying new things? look! mommy's new vacuum! (cat screech) you feel that in your muscles? i do... drin
or their legislatures judicial appointments and those kinds of things. we fought a civil war over this once before, you know, and i just don't think it is right. who --tion would be -- president obama when he severed -- when hed look for sat for 20 years and listen to reverend wright? guest: you know, i'm not quite sure how to answer that question. that there is a lot of variation between the states and the federal systems, and that is really one of the things that we found was that there is so much of a difference between a federal standards and the states, and the states really have so much variation between them. some of them -- the rules are state, soto the you have the separation of powers, you have the state rights. they would have a really unique form and unique standards. i could give examples of your interested. host: sure. guest: in new jersey, they asked the justices to discuss if they own any property in atlantic city. atlantic city geographically the tiny part of new jersey. i guess this came from interest in making sure there were not corruptive influences and gambling. in north carolina,
-- >> and credit. >> right. >> looking at some of the figures who were known to people as established players, when the revolution finished as well as when the civil war was completed, george washington, for example, 1775, seemed to be somewhat of an out lie -- out-ly 'er. >> when i came up with the book, my concern was, washington, the walking marble man, and what us he going to really be a buzz kill once he arrives on the scene after the battle of bunker hill. anything but. i mean, it's just fascinating to see washington. a man from virginia, arriving in new england. a couple weeks after the battle of bunker hill -- and this is a new england army. these are people whose idea of diversity is, okay, i'm from massachusetts but i'm willing to serve in an army with someone from new hampshire. and then to have this plantation owner arrive, and he realizes, this is an army that, because they have grown up with the new england town meeting -- which is a wonderful form of government in which basically people argue until finally they come to a decision. the soldiers in this army, when given an order, would
of guerrilla leaders in civil wars anywhere who just hate the opposition, right? you see that in syria today but he managed not to let that pull him down but to just focus on changing the system and not hating the people. jon: tom carver covered the end of apartheid in south africa for the bcc. he talked to nelson mandela a couple of types. tom, thank you for sharing those thoughts. >> you're welcome. >> some new details emerging from the investigation into the tragic death of paul walker. police now making an arrest in what they say that these two men stole from the scene of the crash and how they found out about it. we'll get you up-to-date on that. >>> also the white house says the obamacare website now works for most americans. why problems with the site can lead to a nasty surprise for some people who think they signed up for insurance. every day we're working to be an even better company - and to keep our commitments. and we've made a big commitment to america. bp supports nearly 250,000 jobs here. througall of our energy operations, we invest more in the u.s. than any other place in t
of the broken escalator, the queen's d.a. dropped the case. >> they would do the right thing and return the 5$500 in this case. >> reporter: when a retailer orders a suspected shoplifter to pay out of pocket, it's a civil demand. some say innocent customers are paying up even though they did nothing wrong, just to avoid legal consequences. sometimes stores send letters straight to a suspect's home. >> it frightens people. they pay whatever to make it go away. >> reporter: they have sent out more than a million collection letters. a recent lawsuit called the firm a letter mill that intimidates them into paying sums of money when retailer haves no intention of suing them. palmer did not respond. >> the majority of shoppers and consumers are honest. >> dan reynolds works for check point systems and help retailers battle shoplifting. stores aggressively pursue thieves for the benefit of everyone. u.s. households pay $300 a year because merchandise theft inflates prices. >> it's a hidden tax. they are paying because shoplifting is ongoing. >> it doesn't mean due process should be taken away. >> re
think mats comply civil underway, a to does not answer to work is going on right now. there's a question in the significant issues are in the midwest due to a variety of factors. in addition to rely on the midwest, the midcontinent iso in the states we need to stay closely involved. >> do you feel like epa is listening to you on these issues because i do because in 2011 when they put out their rule, they include a consultative role for ferc if someone needs a fifth year. i believe that includes not just a fifth year for retrofit but also -- and not just for retrofit but also as they need to figure to bring transmission and before the plan can retire. we voted out a policy statement of how we would handle those. we haven't gotten them yet because it's not far enough along in the process. >> they tell us they're listening to us a lot. sometimes we don't think they are. >> i am very grateful that it comes all the meetings and i'vee a commitment from them that they will continue. but it's something that needs close vigilance. >> i was going to ask you about your priorities. i felt like mr. w
kinds of things. we fought a civil war over this once before, you know, and i just don't think it is right. who --tion would be -- president obama when he severed -- when hed look for sat for 20 years and listen to reverend wright? guest: you know, i'm not quite sure how to answer that question. that there is a lot of variation between the states and the federal systems, and that is really one of the things that we found was that there is so much of a difference between a federal standards and the states, and the states really have so much variation between them. some of them -- the rules are state, soto the you have the separation of powers, you have the state rights. they would have a really unique form and unique standards. i could give examples of your interested. host: sure. guest: in new jersey, they asked the justices to discuss if they own any property in atlantic city. atlantic city geographically the tiny part of new jersey. i guess this came from interest in making sure there were not corruptive influences and gambling. in north carolina, they asked for any -- if any
and in the case of boys, toxic in some ways. so i do believe that children need to be civilized, we have to open our hearts and minds and teach them to be caring and considerate human beings, but that does not mean that forcing boys to be exactly like girls is right, it doesn't mean being girls as if they are failing ophelia's at and for the most part, and this is a radical thing to say, most of them are quite healthy. and including most boys. we have to preserve a distinction, which is why sociologists have to do speed have a distinction between healthy masculinity. a young man that displays pathological masculinity, he shows his manhood by being destructive and tearing things apart, just basically -- a reign of terror. and the boy that has been healthy is the opposite. he is the opposite and he builds and he doesn't prey upon people he protects. and i still believe that that is the majority of men that i have known, and if i look at the data, the majority of men in the united states, they are -- they have been displaying healthy masculinity. the boys playing cops and robbers, it's terrible to
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31